Tel Aviv Pride Parade

With 200,000 people expected to attend, 30,000 of them tourists, the annual pride parade will begin at Gan Meir and then make its way to Charles Clore Park, where a massive beach party will commence.

The Tel Aviv Pride Parade will be held Friday under tight security, with hundreds of police, Border Police and volunteers deployed along the route of the parade to keep the peace.

This year’s parade will focus on the bisexual community, under the tagline Let it Be.

Celebrations will begin at 10am with an event at Gan Meir, which will include music and performances, LGBT community booths and stalls and a special area for children and teens.

The parade itself will leave at around 12pm, with 200,000 people expected to attend, including 30,000 tourists who came to Israel especially for the event.

Marchers will start on Bograshov Street and head west. They will then turn onto HaYarkon Street and head north toward Frishman Street. From there, marchers will head west onto the Herbert Samuel Promenade and head south to Charles Clore Park where a massive beach party will commence.

The floats escorting the parade will start rolling at 1pm along the promenade, eventually reaching Charles Clore Park, where several concerts will be held.

Performers will include Army of Lovers, Julieta, Shimi Tavori and several interchanging DJs.

Roads in the area are expected to close throughout the parade.

Police officers were instructed not to allow weapons, bicycle and electric bicycle into the parade route. In addition, sharp objects, dangerous toys, fireworks and animals (except for guide dogs) will also not be allowed into the parade area.

While police works to combat any crimes in the parade areas, marchers have been asked to closely guard their possessions and not leave any valuables in their cars.

The head of the Israeli Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Association, Chen Arieli, said, “As I march in the parade, I will be particularly proud of the partners I have, people who work in these organizations every day to make the world a better place, and that is a good reason to be proud in my eyes.”

 Arieli noted, however, that the road to equality was still a long one. “The parade began as a protest march. On the one hand, we are celebrating having the freedom to be who we are, and on the other hand there are a lot of complexities. The original reasons for the parade have not yet been gone from the world.”
The Article was published on Ynet

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